America's Currency, 1789-1866 - COAC Proceedings No. 2 edited by William E. Metcalf

US Coins - America's Currency, 1789-1866 - COAC Proceedings No. 2 edited by William E. Metcalf
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The American Numismatic Society, New York, 1986. 142 pages, many b/w plates. Green cloth, NEW copy.

A record of the Coinage of the Americas Conference (COAC) held in 1985. Contents: The Confederate Currency Reform of 1862, The CSA Banking Convention of 1861 and its Delegates, An Historian's View of the State Bank Notes, Collecting Trends in Obsolete American Currency, An Introduction to Obsoloete American Currency, The Financial Concerns of a Government Employee in the 1840s, The History of Development of 'America' as Symbolized by an American Indian Female, The Smillie Family: Banknote Artists, New York City Small Change Bills of 1814-1816, Currency in Crisis: America's Money 1840-1845, and Lynchburg (VA) City Paper Money of 1862.

America's Currency, 1789-1866.
Coinage of the Americas Conference
Proceedings No. 2. (New York, The American Numismatic Society 1986) illus.
ISBN 0-89722-213-K.

BALL, DOUGLAS B. The Confederate Currency Reform of 1862.

The author details the response of the Confederate Treasury Department to the currency crisis of mid-1862 reflecting the lack of competent security printers, shortage of paper and ink, and problems with counterfeiting.

CARLSON, CARL W.A. The SCA Banking Convention of 1861 and its Delegates.

The author describes the purpose, deliberations and resolutions of the convention called shortly after secession to assure circulation of the CSA Treasury notes. Altogether 51 banks from 7 states were represented at two meetings - Atlanta in June and Richmond in July. Particular note is made of the effect on the Confederacy of Louisiana's refusal to suspend specie payments and accept currency instead. Appended is a list of the delegates to the Richmond convention.

CLAIN-STEFANELLI, ELVIRA. An Historian's View of the State Bank Notes: A Mirror of Life in the Early Republic.

The author examines a large variety of note vignettes as contemporary historical documents for such subjects as early settlers and historical scenes; the ethnic environment - the Indian and the Black; family life; farming; transportation - trains, ships, bridges, canals; occupations; city views; buildings; monuments; as well as portraits, and allegorical and mythological scenes.


CRISWELL, GROVER C. Collecting Trends in Obsolete American Currency.

The author traces the history of collecting trends in obsoletes with emphasis on the role of publications in expanding interest in the series and offers several suggestions for developing specialized collections.


DURAND, ROGER H. An Introduction to Obsolete American Currency.

The author provides a summary overview of private bank notes including explanations of the engraving process, the various denominations and reasons for the great variety of vignette subjects, as well as examples of counterfeiting.

GILLILLAND, CORY. The Financial Concerns of a Government Employee in the 1840s.

The work is based on the papers of Lewis Machen, principal clerk of the United States Senate during the first half of the 19th century. The focus is on prices during the 1840s. The author investigates the income, expenses, liabilities, and financial transactions of a salaried government employee and his family during the period of experimental banking in the United States.


HESSLER, GENE. The History and Development of 'America' as Symbolized by an American Indian Female.

The iconographic image of America, formulated by Europeans, is traced as it appears on paintings, engravings, drawings, and objets d'art from the 16th to the 19th centuries. Paul Revere, and many American artists who followed, continued to use the female American Indian as America's representative beyond 1782 when the bald eagle became the official symbol. Considering the preceding, decorative devices used on money from around the world, it was only logical that the Indian Princess was selected to adorn bank notes of the United States, both federal and obsolete private and state issues.


JACKSON, GLENN E. The Smillie Family: Banknote Artists.

The author traces the career of James Smillie who emigrated from Scotland to Canada in 1821. It describes his beginning as an engraver eventually moving his family from Toronto to New York because of the increased demand for engravers' services. Several examples of his work are illustrated showing how his signature was omitted from many vignettes in the process of printing. J.D. Smillie, one of his sons, overcame this by including his initials or name in the design of the vignette.

NEWMAN, ERIC P. New York City Small Change Bills of 1814-1816.

The economic problems in New York City caused by the War of 1812 resulted in the emission by the Corporation of the City of New York of small change paper money as a substitute for small coin. The printing of the issue, its authorization, signing, uses, redemption, misappropriation, unconstitutionality, frauds, errors and counterfeiting are described. Its relationship to other public and private issues is outlined. The money of account used in New York at the time of its issuance is shown to be determinative of its denominations. The 1863 reprints are also discussed.


VLACK, ROBERT. Currency in Crisis: America's Money, 1840-1845.

Following a brief history of the Bank of the United States prior to Jackson's election, the author details the personal struggle between President Jackson and Nicholas Biddle, President of the Bank of the U.S. from 1823, for control of the bank, with the resultant banking panic and depression of the mid-1830s. The currency of the period is assayed as a reflection of the contemporary economic turbulence and political in-fighting.


WILLIAMSON, RAYMOND H. Lynchburg (VA) City Paper Money of 1862.

By 1862 the Civil War had produced widespread hoarding of hard money in the Confederacy, so that small notes (under $1) were much needed for making change.

The history of such notes issued by the city of Lynchburg is reviewed as typical of what transpired in many other cities and counties of the South. A landmark court case settled in 1871 finalized the demonetization of these notes. While four of the eight denominations (15, 30, 60, 90 cents) now seem capricious, they are probably traceable to the same denominations in Virginia colonial pence of the Revolutionary War period.

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