CONSTANTINE I, THE GREAT, 307/310-337 AD. (AV Solidus 4.42g 20.6mm) [NGC CHOICE XF 5/5-2/5] Trier Mint 335-336 AD.

Ancient Coins - CONSTANTINE I, THE GREAT, 307/310-337 AD. (AV Solidus 4.42g 20.6mm) [NGC CHOICE XF 5/5-2/5] Trier Mint 335-336 AD.
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    CONSTANTINE I, THE GREAT, 307/310-337 AD. (AV Solidus 4.42g 20.6mm) Trier Mint, Struck 335-336 AD.  
OBV. CONSTANTI NVS MAX AVG, Bust of Constantine I, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed, right.
RV. SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Securitas standing facing with legs crossed, head right, hand on head and leaning on column. TR in exergue. Golden and florescent highlights around devises, very nice toning.
RIC 577 

       With such impiety pervading the human race, and the State threatened with destruction, what relief did God devise?...I myself was the instrument he chose....Thus, beginning at the remote Ocean of Britain, where the sun sinks beneath the horizon in obedience to the law of Nature, with God's help I banished and eliminated every form of evil then prevailing, in the hope that the human race, enlightened through me, might be recalled to a proper observance of God's holy laws.
                                                                     Constantine the Great, quoted by Eusebius, De Vita Constantini, II, 28.
Eusebius states that; "Constantine built magnificent churches in; Constantinople, Nicomedia, The Metropolitan Church at Antioch, The Church of the Passion in Jerusalem, and three in Jerusalem which marked the birthplace, deathplace, and assumption of Christ. These he built to the honor of that faith which had made him so mighty & bestowed upon him such strength..."  Constantine I was the first beardless emperor since Trajan.
     The Basilica of St. John Lateran is the cathedral of Rome. It was built during the reign of Constantine I & was consecrated by Pope Sylvester I in 324. This feast was later made a universal celebration in honor of the basilica called "the mother and mistress of all the churches of Rome & the world" (omnium urbis et orbis ecclesiarum mater et caput) as a sign of love for & union with the See of Peter. 
      St. Blase, 316 - bishop & martyr, enjoyed widespread veneration in both the Eastern & Western Churches due to many cures attributed to him. According to tradition, he was Bishop of Sebaste in Armenia & was martyred under Licinius.
      St. George, martyr +303,  lived shortly before Constantine's I reign. Popular tradition presents St. George as the knight who killed the dragon, making him a symbol of a triumph of faith against the forces of evil. He was born into an illustrious family in Cappadocia and at a young age was raised to the ministry during Emperor Diocletian's reign. When the emperor promulgated an edict against the Christians, St. George professed his faith publicly, for which he was martyred. He is a patron saint of England, Portugal, Germany, Aragon, Genoa, & Venice, His tomb is in Lod, near Tel Aviv, in Israel.
St. Athanasius, 297-373, was bishop of Alexandria, Egypt and became the champion of the faith against Arianism in the Council of Nicaea, a council of Christian bishops, convened by Constantine I in 325 AD. He suffered much persecution, including 17 years of exile, for resisting compromise in essentials of the faith. He wrote many outstanding works on apologetics. St. Nicholas was also present at the council of Nicaea where he signed the document affirming the divinity of Christ. He served as Bishop of Myra (in what is now Turkey) and is known especially for his compassion for the poor.
      St. Catherine of Alexandria, +310, was a virgin & martyr. According to tradition, St. Catherine was a woman remarkable for her courage & learning. She denounced the emperor Maxentius in person, and when she refused to apostatize, he had her put in prison. From prison Catherine successfully converted the emperor's wife as well as two hundred of his soldiers before he had her killed. St. Catherine is the patron saint of philosophers, maidens, & preachers.  

The Mulvian bridge where Constantine fought Maxentius.
A bust of Constantine I in Rome.
A bronze in York, England marking the location where Constantine I was proclaimed Augustus. 
A mosaic of Constantine I inside Hagia Sophia in Constantinople. 
Ancient Coins - CONSTANTINE I, THE GREAT, 307/310-337 AD. (AV Solidus 4.42g 20.6mm) [NGC CHOICE XF 5/5-2/5] Trier Mint 335-336 AD.
Ancient Coins - CONSTANTINE I, THE GREAT, 307/310-337 AD. (AV Solidus 4.42g 20.6mm) [NGC CHOICE XF 5/5-2/5] Trier Mint 335-336 AD.
Ancient Coins - CONSTANTINE I, THE GREAT, 307/310-337 AD. (AV Solidus 4.42g 20.6mm) [NGC CHOICE XF 5/5-2/5] Trier Mint 335-336 AD.
Ancient Coins - CONSTANTINE I, THE GREAT, 307/310-337 AD. (AV Solidus 4.42g 20.6mm) [NGC CHOICE XF 5/5-2/5] Trier Mint 335-336 AD.
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