Parthia(?), 'Athenian Series'. Hekatompylos(?). c. 246/5-239/8 BC. AR Didrachm. From the 1960s Andragoras-Sophytes Group, in Germany in 1975, subsequently exported to the USA

Ancient Coins - Parthia(?), 'Athenian Series'. Hekatompylos(?). c. 246/5-239/8 BC. AR Didrachm. From the 1960s Andragoras-Sophytes Group, in Germany in 1975, subsequently exported to the USA
zoom view

Parthia(?), 'Athenian Series'. Hekatompylos(?). c. 246/5-239/8 BC. AR Didrachm, 8.10g (20mm, 5h). Attic standard. Head of Athena right, wearing earring, necklace, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl; monogram of Andragoras(?) behind / Owl standing right, head facing; behind, prow and grape bunch on vine with leaf, AΘE before.

Pedigree: From the 1960s Andragoras-Sophytes Group, present in Germany in 1975, subsequently exported to the USA.

References: Roma XIV, 331; Bopearachchi, Sophytes Series 1A; SNG ANS 6; N&A 43-45

Grade: Nicely centered and well struck. EF

Price: $1,400

gk1349


These interesting coins show the strength of imagery of the Athenian tetradrachm that had commenced production some 300 years previously. Bearing the head of Athena and the owl, yet distinctly different from its forefather, the coin is also struck on the Attic weight standard.


The coins are clouded in uncertainty regarding origin or even if they are correctly identified at all. This coin was sold as coming from Hekatompylos, which is modern day Qumus, Iran. The Greek and Persian word of Hekatompylos translates into “one hundred gates”. Simply put, this meant that the town had more than four gates of entry into the city.


Andragoras was governor of Parthia appointed in 253 by Antiochus II. Eventually Andragoras and his counterpart Diodotus, governor of Bactria joined forces against the Seleucid regime. When they tried to declare independence from their Seleciud overlords they also started minting coins in their own name. This coin suggests such was the case with the monogram of Andragoras behind the head of Athena.


There is an article on Academia.edu that suggests that the coins were not struck at all in Hekatompylos. I do not endorse the cataloguers opinion necessarily but I do think it is an interesting article that deserves discussion. A link is here:


https://www.academia.edu/38857202/On_Andragoras_and_Sophytes_A_Historical_and_Numismatic_Analysis_English_?auto=download

Price SKU: gk1349
US$ 1,400.00
  • € 1,283.66
  • £ 1,126.30
  • AUD 2,306.78
  • CHF 1,354.36
  • CAD 1,983.38

Rates for: 04/02/20

Ships from: United States
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