Commodus AE26 of Hadrianopolis, Thrace. Hercules battling with the horses of Diomedes. Jurukova 110cf.

Ancient Coins - Commodus AE26 of Hadrianopolis, Thrace. Hercules battling with the horses of Diomedes. Jurukova 110cf.
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No. 3561. Commodus AE26 of Hadrianopolis, Thrace. AVT K AIL AVPH (KOMODOC), laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right / (HG COY MAPKIANOY ADRI) ANOPOLEITWN, Hercules battling with the horses of Diomedes. Jurukova 110cf.

 

The eight labor: The Man-Eating Horses of Diomedes

After Hercules had captured the Cretan Bull,Eurystheus sent him to get the man-eating mares ofDiomedes, the king of a Thracian tribe called theBistones, and bring them back to him in Mycenae. According to Apollodorus, Hercules sailed with aband of volunteers across the Aegean to Bistonia.There he and his companions overpowered thegrooms who were tending the horses, and drove themto the sea. But by the time he got there, the Bistoneshad realized what had happened, and they sent a bandof soldiers to recapture the animals. To free himselfto fight, Hercules entrusted the mares to a youthnamed Abderos. Unfortunately, the mares got the better of youngAbderos and dragged him around until he was killed. Meanwhile Hercules fought the Bistones, killedDiomedes, and made the rest flee. In honor of theslain Abderos, Hercules founded the city of Abdera. The hero took the mares back to Eurystheus, butEurystheus set them free. The mares wandered around until eventually they came to Mount Olympos, thehome of the gods, where they were eaten by wildbeasts. Euripides gives two different versions of the story,but both of them differ from Apollodorus's in thatHercules seems to be performing the labor alone,rather than with a band of followers. In one,Diomedes has the four horses harnessed to a chariot,and Hercules has to bring back the chariot as well asthe horses. In the other, Hercules tames the horsesfrom his own chariot: He mounted on a chariot and tamed with the bit thehorses of Diomedes, that greedily champed theirbloody food at gory mangers with unbridled jaws,devouring with hideous joy the flesh of men. Euripides, Hercules, 380

Preis SKU: 3561
US$ 475.00
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